How to use analytics to grow your business - KARL STAIB

How to use analytics to grow your business – KARL STAIB | DMR #158

Today I’m joined by a man who can help you improve how you gather data; and use it to improve your business. Welcome to DMR, the “Analytics Growth Guy” Karl Staib. [You can find Karl over at DominoConnection.com.]

How to use analytics to grow your business - KARL STAIB

How to use analytics to grow your business – KARL STAIB

On this episode of Digital Marketing Radio we discuss how to use analytics to grow your business, with topics including:

  • How often should a business look at its website analytics?
  • Should even a small business owner try to get comfortable with reviewing website stats?
  • What important stats in particular tend to get overlooked?
  • How do you improve your stats?
  • Is A/B testing essential?
  • What are some good things to focus on in an A/B test?
  • I don’t hear much about multivariate testing nowadays – is that still sometimes better that A/B tests?
  • What about user testing? Can that be better than analyzing your stats sometime?

Software I couldn’t live without

What software do you currently use in your business that if someone took away from you, it would significantly impact your marketing success?

Google Docs [Online document creation & sharing]

Visual Website Optimizer [A/B split testing software]

What software don’t you use, but you’ve heard good things about, and you’ve intended to try at some point in the near future?

Unbounce [easy landing pages & split-testing]

My number 1 takeaway

What’s the single most important step from our discussion that our listeners need to take away and implement in their businesses?

If you think you need you redesign your website, you probably don’t. I know it makes you feel good, and it’s nice to have a fancier looking site, but some of the best sites out there are just very simple, very straightforward, easy to navigate. And I would suggest looking at those analytics – what’s going on behind the scenes? And start making small changes versus a ‘splashy change’.